UPDATE:

The 2019 legislative session has its first bills already put forward.

Sen. Adam Morfeld of Lincoln has a proposal that would allow law enforcement to confiscate firearms from people found by a court to be extreme risks.

"Somebody who has threatened to kill other people," Morfeld said.  "People that have exhibited domestic violence and have current ongoing threats with somebody in their household."

Morfeld said he was pushed to propose this bill because he said there's so many shootings by people who are mentally ill or who've made violent threats.

"I think we need to protect our communities and provide our law enforcement with the tools necessary to protect our communities," he said.

Gov. Pete Ricketts said, like Morfeld, he wants safer communities, but that he has some reservations.

"I also want to make sure we're not infringing upon anybody's Second Amendment rights," Ricketts said.  "So usually what we do is we let the legislative process work out and examine the bills as they get more mature."

Morfeld said the bill provides the same amount of due process as any other court that can take away firearms.

Also Thursday, Sen. Ernie Chambers introduced a bill that would repeal the death penalty.

His last successful attempt at abolishing it was overturned by voters in 2016.

"I would say that if the legislature is thinking about picking that up, they should remember that the people of Nebraska not too long ago already decided what ought to be done with the death penalty," Ricketts said.

New Secretary of State Bob Evnen is looking for a senator to put up a bill requiring voter I.D. in Nebraska.

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Sen. Adam Morfeld of Lincoln has a proposal he says is aimed at reducing gun violence.

His bill would allow law enforcement to confiscate firearms from people found by a court to be extreme risks.

"Somebody who has threatened to kill other people," Morfeld said.  "People that have exhibited domestic violence and have current ongoing threats with somebody in their household."

Morfeld said he was pushed to propose this bill because there's so many shootings by people who are mentally ill or who've made violent threats.

Gov. Pete Ricketts said, like Morfeld, he wants safer communities, but that he has some reservations.

"I also want to make sure we're not infringing upon anybody's Second Amendment rights," Ricketts said.  "So usually what we do is we let the legislative process work out and examine the bills as they get more mature."

Morfeld said the bill provides the same amount of due process as any other court that can take away firearms.

He said the Judiciary Committee is likely to hear the bill.