Senator Deb Fischer talks Lincoln’s growth and infrastructure

Posted By: Reid Kilmer
rkilmer@klkntv.com

Wednesday U.S. Senator Deb Fischer and U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx came to Lincoln to talk infrastructure.

The two met with several Nebraska transportation entities to discuss concerns and share opinions.

Senator Fischer says she's committed to pushing her long term highway bill through to create project funding for six years.

Senator Fischer said, "I think we need to look at long term sustainable funding for our infrastructure our highways and bridges Nebraskans understand the importance and the positive impact good roads have on their lives whether its traveling safely with their family or for commerce to move."

Secretary Foxx says this bill is an important step because short term solutions aren't the answer.

Secretary Foxx said, "Frankly how many projects can you get done in three months start to finish or two months or one year? it takes planning, it takes work, it takes design, it takes engineering, and it takes construction, and that process takes multiple years and so it is incumbent on us as a nation to recognize that we need a long term highway bill for this country."

An example of funding importance for highways in growing cities like Lincoln can be seen at Northwest 48th. The “Diverging Diamond Interchange” design is currently being constructed.

This project is widening Northwest 48th to four lanes and I–80 to six lanes. 

The state say the vehicles per day on I–80 will exceed from 35,000 in 2009 to more than 92,000 in 2034.

On Northwest 48th, the state says about 12,000 vehicles were on the road per day in 2009 and by 2034 it's estimated there will be more than 58,000.

Senator Fischer says, "This is a big deal to get a six year highway bill passed this is a very big deal."

The six lane widening and the Northwest 48th project is expected to be done in the fall of 2016 costing over 36 million dollars.

Senator Fischer's bill will be discussed more in Washington this upcoming fall.