UPDATE:

It's not just driving conditions that the snow affects.

Nebraska Mental Health Centers said it could also mess with your mood. 

Clinical Psychologist Dr. Lisa Logsden They said they're seeing more seasonal depression in their patients than in previous years.

"This span of snow that we have had and the cold weather have made it really particularly difficult this season because people have less access to some of their coping skills; particularly those that are outside," Dr. Logsden said.

She said the snow keeps people from going for walks, going to the dog parks, getting exercise and just being in the sunshine.

"A lot of research that has shown that vitamin D is really important to mental health, particularly depression symptoms."

She said this leads to increased irritability, sadness and less energy.

But she said there are other ways to try and cope.

"Some of those strategies can be trying to still get out and have some sort of social connection," she said.  "The other is if you can't get outside, still being able to pick up the phone and call a family member, call a friend just to be able to have that connection with someone else."

She said even finding something productive to do around the house can provide a sense of value or happiness.

Dr. Logsden said taking vitamin D supplements and light therapy are also options.  But she emphasized talking to your physician to make sure those are right for you.

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With all the snow Lincoln's had lately, you may be feeling a little down.

Nebraska Mental Health Centers said they're seeing more seasonal depression in their patients than in previous years.

It's called Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD for short.

Clinical Psychologist Dr. Lisa Logsden said on top of that, the snow makes it tougher.

"This span of snow that we have had and the cold weather has made it really particularly difficult this season because people have less access to some of their coping skills; particularly those that are outside," Dr. Logsden said.

She said the snow keeps people from going for walks, going to the dog parks, getting exercise and just being in the sunshine.  She said this leads to increased irritability, sadness and less energy.

Dr. Logsden said there are other ways to try and cope.

"Some of those strategies can be trying to still get out and have some sort of social connection," she said.  "The other is if you can't get outside, still being able to pick up the phone and call a family member, call a friend just to be able to have that connection with someone else."

She said even finding something productive to do around the house can provide a sense of value or happiness.