A new law in Nebraska is making revenge porn a criminal offense.

Revenge porn is defined as sending out explicit images of someone without their consent or knowledge to embarrass or coerce them.

Recently, Husker running back Maurice Washington has made headlines for his legal case in California under the same law. That case is still in the court system, and Washington has not been convicted of any crime as of now.

With this new law going into effect in Nebraska, many people have questions about what it all entails.

"This bill criminalizes disseminating an image that was otherwise legal to possess," said Justin Kalemkiarian, an attorney at Berry Law Firm in Lincoln.

Kalemkiarian says very few cases have come forward so far about revenge porn, but as time goes on, he expects more to pop up.

In these cases, an explicit image would have to be sent knowingly to others, and applies to a variety of platforms.

"In general what we expect is it will be prosecuted for sharing the image, so I text it to you, I Snapchat it to you, I send it to you through Kik," Kalemkiarian said.

Several senators had a hand in making this bill into a law, and say they had little opposition to it in the unicameral.

Senator Adam Morfeld says he hopes the law gives people back their peace of mind if they find themselves in a compromising situation.

"I hope that people just generally feel safer and that the state is protecting them against all types of physical violence or in my opinion, this is mental violence," Morfeld said.

Law experts say if you find yourself in a situation where you may charged with sending revenge porn, you should call an attorney immediately, since it is now a criminal offense.

But most of all, they say to always think before hitting send.

"It's not just a Snapchat, it's not just a Kik, it's not just a text message - there are lives at stake, including the person's who's sending it," Kalemkiarian said.

The penalty for sending out revenge porn carries a sentence of one year in jail, a one thousand dollar fine, or both. After the first offense, it becomes a felony, which carries a lifetime of consequences.