Beatrice Public Schools will not adopt proposed Health Standards presented by the state

Beatrice public schools has submitted a letter to the state board of education to express their concern about the topics covered in their proposed standards with the hopes, they will make adjustments.
Beatrice Public Schools

BEATRICE, Neb. (KLKN) –It’s been a controversial topic, proposed health education standards from the state. Many saying the subject matter is too sexualized for younger children, and they won’t teach it.

Beatrice public schools has submitted a letter to the state board of education to express their concern about the topics covered in their proposed standards with the hopes, they will make adjustments.

“I think for us it, it all came down to what’s developmentally appropriate. In looking at, at the specific age level, and some of the things that were being proposed, we just didn’t feel like they were developmentally appropriate for the students here,” Jason Alexander, the Superintendent with Beatrice Public Schools, said.

Parents and teachers have been taking a serious look into a proposed comprehensive sexuality education curriculum presented by the Nebraska Board of Education. In doing so, not all agree with what could be taught.

For example, teaching elementary kids about sexual orientation and gender identity.

“When I was reading what they were going to try to pass to teach for these kids, frightening was probably the biggest word, parent, Sabrina Glynn said.”

Opponents say the standards threaten to sexualize children and teach them certain things at a young age.

Now, BPS has gone through the process of looking through every detail of the proposal and have sent a letter to the board of education saying they will not be adopting the curriculum.

“Taking that in, and listening to that concern, and hearing it from our staff, and the things that they might be a little uncomfortable with, really was the key to making sure that we were on record,” Alexander said.

Parents like Sabrina, were happy to hear of the decision by Beatrice as they felt it fit with community expectations.

Still, in May, many supported the proposal and said it could some children better understand inclusivity.

“These standards will help give children the language to say what’s happening to them,” Andrew Gardner of Grand Island said.

Alexander said he sees all sides of the argument and is focusing on finding a happy medium for the Beatrice community.

The board of education is expected to release a second draft of their proposal sometime in August.

Categories: Education News, Nebraska News, News