Bryan Health at full capacity, advising new treatment for high risk COVID-19 cases

From transferring patients to advising you to get your COVID 19 and Flu shots, Bryan Health officials says they are at full capacity. 
Health

LINCOLN, Neb. (KLKN) — Serious news from Bryan Health on Thursday. They say they’re at the breaking point, full of patients at their hospitals. 

From transferring patients to advising you to get your COVID 19 and Flu shots, Bryan Health officials says they are at full capacity. 

“At Brian, we are at a physical capacity limit,” said Bob Ravenscroft, VP of advancement. “There’s other places where there might be a little bit of physical capacity, but there aren’t, aren’t staff to, you know, fully staff, those facilities, and that’s, that’s, you know, sporadic all over the state. So, we are maxed out as a health care system.” 

Bryan Health reports they’ve reached their limit with 552 patients. 

In total, 71 cases are covid patients and they have been transferring some people to rural hospitals to maintain space for COVID-19 patients. 

Dr. Jim Nora worries as flu season starts, numbers could rise to where some patients may not receive care. 

“The next concern is, do we have to go into what what’s termed crisis capacity, where we have to make decisions that nobody wants to make about triage in healthcare resources,” said Nora. 

Dr. Nora says Bryan Health has been full for about four weeks. It’s just they’re at the point where there’s no more room or the staff to take care of anymore patients. 

Although they believe some stabilization is occurring, officials still push for you to get you COVID-19 and flu vaccines to control the spread of viruses. 

Now there’s a new antibody treatment being offered for some high risk COVID-19 positive cases. 

In fact, Bryan has set up a special area to give these treatments.  

” In general, we would love to offer monoclonal antibodies to anybody who has had illness that is onset within the last 10 days, and has significant risk factors for more serious illness,” said Dr. Nora. 

Risk factors include being overweight, pregnant, and or 18 and up with risk factors. 

Dr. Nora highly recommends the antibody treatment for pregnant women with COVID-19 who have not been vaccinated. This experimental drug has been approved for emergency use by the FDA. 

Bryan officials hope this treatment along with more people getting vaccinated will lower the amount of patients in the hospitals. 

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