Husker softball’s Courtney Wallace posts powerful message on racial injustice

"I decided that I was going to take a stand because if no one else was going to do it, then I'm going to be the one to do it," Wallace said. "Why have someone else say what I feel when I can just do it myself."
Courtney Wallace

LINCOLN – Courtney Wallace usually let’s her game do the talking.

However, after seeing the racial injustice surrounding the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and James Scurlock, the Papillion native refused to be silent any longer.

“That could be my dad, that could be my brother,” said Wallace, an African-American softball player at Nebraska. “That could have been one of my friends at Nebraska, that could have been anyone. So that’s when I got really emotional about it.”

So Wallace made a social media post on Sunday, sharing her message to Husker Nation.

“I decided that I was going to take a stand because if no one else was going to do it, then I’m going to be the one to do it,” Wallace said. “Why have someone else say what I feel when I can just do it myself.”

In the post, which now has over 220 retweets and over 1,500 likes, Wallace says, “Enough is enough. I will not continue to sit back quietly for others comfort.” The message has led to many conversations with fellow Nebraska student-athletes and her teammates.

“People need to understand how we feel,” Wallace said. “We probably wouldn’t have gotten this opportunity if this didn’t happen. Or we wouldn’t have talked about it. So I’ve just tried to be, like I said, really encouraging and try to tell them that this is OK. This is OK for you to talk about and use your voice.”

Wallace came to Nebraska as a Gatorade Player of the Year from Papillion-La Vista High School. However, it wasn’t always easy for her growing up.

“Just with other students calling me the ‘N’ word while walking down the hallway,” Wallace said. “Just little things like that, confederate flags on trucks. You see that stuff, but there isn’t a lot of other kids to talk with that about.”

And now, Wallace hopes her platform at Nebraska can help her give others like her a chance to open up. And she’s OK having that kind of pressure to lead other Husker student-athletes.

“Pressure is when you don’t have a home, don’t have a house, you’re losing your job. This is an opportunity. This a great opportunity for some of us to be able to speak our minds. And like I said, I’m going to do it.”

Categories: Husker Sports, Sports