Great weekend ahead, ending with rain showers

 

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (WLNE) — After a soaker dumped nearly 2 inches of rain across southern New England, we’ll continue to dry out.  We’re back to a frosty start the next few mornings as high pressure builds in with a lighter wind. No big storms for the next several days. We’ll end the weekend with a few rain showers Sunday night, but our next storm may track farther south mid-week next week giving us a chance at some snow as we begin February.

All across southern New England, rain totals by Thursday morning were between 1 .5 and 2 inches. River beds have crested and are beginning to fall, but we continue with a Flood Warning issued by the National Weather Service through 7 am Saturday. This is for local areas near the Pawtuxet, Wood, and Pawcatuck rivers.

Wind gusted highest at and offshore as expected. No wind related power outages were reported.

 

Forecast and graphics prepared by Meteorologist Nick Morganelli

TODAY: Lots of sunshine. High near 40. Moderate Breeze W 10-20 mph.

THIS EVE: Mainly clear. Temperatures falling through the 30s. Diminishing wind.

TONIGHT: Moonlight. Low near 30. Light wind

SATURDAY: Dry and mild with sun and clouds. Highs in the 40s.

SUNDAY: Mostly cloudy. high near 48 with evening light showers. Breezy S wind 10-15 mph.

Monday and Tuesday: Spotty shower late Monday, otherwise continued mild with sun and clouds.  40s.

 

WHY THE MILD, SNOW-LESS WINTER?

A BIG INFLUENCE IS OCEAN TEMPERATURES IN THE PACIFIC.

La Nina (opposite of El Nino and one of the reasons for our mild, snow-less winter) occurs periodically. This year it’s back.

Much like upwelling at our shoreline, the cooler water just below the surface rises when the warm surface water is pushed away by the trade winds. At our Rhode Island beaches, when there’s a land breeze, the same effect happens on a smaller scale. Warmer gulf stream waters are pushed away from the shoreline and cooler water at greater depths along the continental shelf rise to the surface.

Those fast winds at about 5 miles up govern our weather pattern and this is pretty close to what we’ve had this winter so far. We’ll have to see whether La Nina conditions wane in February and March. If they do, that pattern may turn more wintry than spring-like.

January, our normally coldest month, is just about done and it will go on record as a warm one. There is an indication that winter cold and the chance for snow may be in the offing for the last weekend of the month and prepare to welcome February.

Categories: National and World News