Pro-life, pro-choice advocates weigh in on proposed abortion bill

On Wednesday, Senator Julie Slama of Peru and 20 co-sponsors introduced a bill, LB781, that would ban abortions in Nebraska if a heartbeat is detected by an ultrasound.

LINCOLN, Neb. (KLKN) – On Wednesday, Senator Julie Slama of Peru and 20 co-sponsors introduced a bill, LB781, that would ban abortions in Nebraska if a heartbeat is detected by an ultrasound.

Pro-choice advocates are gravely concerned about what this could mean for the future of abortion in the state.

“This could effectively ban abortion before most people even know they’re pregnant just two weeks after a missed period,” Scout Richters of ACLU Nebraska said. “State senators need to reject this proposal because the majority of Nebraskans believe that abortion should remain safe and legal.”

According to a Pew Research study from 2014, 50% of Nebraskans feel abortion should be legal in most cases while 46% of Nebraskas believe it should be illegal.

Nationwide, nearly 60% of Americans feel abortion should be legal in most cases.

Nate Gracz of the Nebraska Family Alliance tells Channel 8 that he’s had conversations with Slama in the months leading up to Wednesday about what a pro-life bill could look like in the state.

“A heartbeat is an unmistakable sign of life,” Grasz said. “And as science and technology have improved, they’ve given us a better picture into life inside the womb than ever before. These are the lives of precious children that we’re fighting to protect.”

People on both sides of the debate are prepared for a contentious couple of months.

“We have a great pro-life majority in our Nebraska Legislature, but it’s going to take a really a full team effort, as well as people across the state voicing their support for this legislation,” Grasz said.

Richters advises people who are concerned about this bill passing to contact their senator and talk to their neighbors about the issue.

“These issues are between Nebraskans and their families, and their doctors,” Richters said. “The government, including Senator Slama needs to stay out of it.”

Channel 8 reached out to Slama for an interview. A member of her team referred to statements the senator made on her Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Categories: Capitol News, Lancaster, Nebraska News